December 2015 Posts

The State Of Mankind Improves Through Music

It is said that the state of mankind improves through music; music not only trains but educates individuals and makes them fit for a life of community. Music is spiritual and mental food, an edifying and educational power. In comparison with sports (the motion of bodies), music (the motion of sounds) belongs to a higher sphere. In extreme cases, one encounters the tenet that music actually elevates man into a higher realm, transforming him into a new form of the human species.
~ Albrecht Riethmüller, “Music Beyond Ethics,” Archiv für Musikwissenschaft, p. 170, Volume 65, Issue 3, 2008.

Paige’s Music Holiday Store Hours

Holiday-Hours-2015

Our store ours are slightly different than year’s past based on the way the holidays fell on the calendar this year.

Here is a rundown for the rest of 2015.

Wednesday, December 30th – Open 10am – 6pm
Thursday, December 31st – Open 10am – 3pm
Friday, January 1st – CLOSED
Saturday, January 2nd – CLOSED

If you need to have something delivered to your school on Monday, January 4th, please place your order by Thursday before 3pm.

Thanks for a great 2015.  Please have a safe and happy New Year from all of us at Paige’s Music!

Children Who Take Music Lessons Show Improved Memory

Young children who take music lessons show different brain development and improved memory over the course of a year, compared to children who do not receive musical training.
~ Arete Music Academy. “Statistical benefits of music in education.” Arete Music Academy. Accessed July 17, 2014.

Children Who Take Music Lessons Show Different Brain Development

Young children who take music lessons show different brain development and improved memory over the course of a year, compared to children who do not receive musical training.
~ National Association for Music Education. “The Benefits of the Study of Music.” National Association for Music Education. Accessed July 17, 2014.

Music Education Provides A Myriad Of Social-Emotional Skills

Majorities of both parents and teachers see a myriad of social-emotional, academic, 21st century skill, community, and physical and health benefits from music education—especially social-emotional benefits
~ NAMM Foundation and Grunwald Associates LLC (2015). Striking a Chord: The Public’s Hopes and Beliefs for K–12 Music Education in
the United States: 2015.

Music Has Been Found To Stimulate The Brain and Enhance Memory

Music has been found to stimulate parts of the brain, and studies have demonstrated that music enhances the memory of Alzheimer’s and dementia patients, including a study conducted at UC Irvine, which showed that scores on memory tests of Alzheimer’s patients improved when they listened to classical music.
~ Cheri Lucas, Education.com, “Boost Memory and Learning with Music,” pbs.org.

Basic Tuning Tips – Woodwinds

In our next couple of blogs we are going to talk about the basics of tuning your instrument. While this may seem oversimplified there are some important details about the different families and the instruments within that are important to know.

All brass and woodwind instruments are designed around the A440/A442 pitch and can be adjusted higher (sharper) or lower (flatter) to a certain extent. Adjusting too far either way will affect the scale of the instrument and can actually cause playing problems.

On this blog we will start with the woodwinds.


Flute/Piccolo-Where the head joint tenon fits into the  receiver at the top of the main body tube is where the tuning is done. You would normally start by inserting the tenon all the way in and then pulling it out about 1/8-3/16 inch to start tuning. Then you would push in more to raise the pitch or pull it out to lower. Never use the head crown assembly for general tuning. For more info about the head crown assembly see our post titled "There’s A Cork In My Flute. What Does It Do?".

 

Bb-Eb Clarinets-Where the barrel fits onto the top of the upper joint is where the primary tuning is done. After assembling the clarinet pull the barrel out about 1/8-3/16 inch to start. Then you can push on further to raise or pull out to lower the pitch. The mouthpiece should always be all the way into the barrel.

 

Alto/Bass Clarinets-These depend somewhat on the make and model of the instrument. Basically the tuning is done by adjusting the way the neck fits into the receiver. Out if it is sharp or in if flat. On pro models the neck is usually in two pieces with a slide attachment to do the same.

 

Saxophones-All the saxophones have a cork on the neck that the mouthpiece fits onto and the mouthpiece itself can be adjusted on further to raise and pull out to lower the pitch. An alto sax mouthpiece should go on about ¾ inch to start with and tenor/baritone sax about 1inch.

 

On clarinets and saxophones the mouthpiece itself can affect the tuning also. Different brands have different lengths so if you are having an extreme problem being too flat or sharp to begin with a different mouthpiece can help out.


Oboe-Oboes have a cork tube that is part of the reed. This can then be adjusted in or out of the reed receiver at the top. Different brands of reeds also have varying overall lengths which can make a difference.

 

Bassoon-Bassoons have a little bit of adjustability in or out where the bocal fits into the receiver of the body. However, it is limited because the whisper key on the body must be able to cover the whisper key riser on the bocal.

 

Bocals come in three different lengths to help facilitate tuning. #1 (the shortest), #2 (most common) and #3 (longest).

bassoon-vocals


As I stated in the beginning these are just some basic details about the tuning of your instrument. Nothing is more important than carefully listening and learning “how” to play your instrument in tune with others. It is constantly changing and you must learn how to adapt to your different playing environments.

Students At Schools With Excellent Music Programs Had Higher English Test Scores

Students at schools with excellent music programs had higher English test scores across the country than students in schools with low-quality music programs; this was also true when considering mathematics.
~ Journal for Research in Music Education, June 2007; Dr. Christopher Johnson, Jenny Memmott