Tucker Woerner Posts

Have You Heard with Jim Pugh

In the summer of 2012 I attended the Skidmore Jazz Institute in New York where I had the privilege of working with some of my biggest musical heroes. In addition to coaching and classes with greats like Pat LaBarbera and Todd Coolman I was also able to study privately with Curtis Fuller and Jim Pugh.

The Legendary Bill Watrous

This Saturday would have been the 80thbirthday of legendary trombonist Bill Watrous. As we approach our first June without him let’s celebrate his fantastic career by revisiting some of his most prolific recordings. For younger players who might not yet be acquainted with Bill Watrous read Scott Yanow’s biography on Watrous below.

Three Exciting New Trombone Albums to Check Out

With so much new content out there it can be difficult to sift through everything. Here are three new albums featuring trombonists that I can’t stop listening to. Read what the artists have to say about the works and follow the links for more information on the performers. Be sure to pick up your copies of these albums with the information listed.

Steve Davis – Correlations

Steve Davis has been one of my all-time favorite trombonists since I first heard him. His style and sound are heavily influenced by JJ Johnson, and his harmonic sensibilities draw additionally from players like Jackie McLean and Freddie Hubbard. Davis never plays more or less than the music demands. A sensitive and thoughtful player, he consistently bring something fresh to each track while paying homage to the masters.

Ball State University Trombone Day II

On April 6th, 2018 Ball State University hosted Trombone Day II. This event was a full day of rehearsals, masterclasses, lectures, and performances that showcased all of the fine resources the school has to offer. Chris Van Hof, Assistant Professor of Music Performance (Trombone), led the event, and trombone legend, Jim Pugh, was the featured artist of the day.

5 Ways To Keep Up With Your Instrument Over Summer Break

Don’t fall behind on maintenance.

Summer vacation is a fantastic way to recharge and prepare yourself for the following year. While you’re spending time outside and taking a break be sure to keep up with your instrument to set yourself up for a strong start to the next year. Here are some helpful tips to keep in mind this summer that will keep your instrument, abilities, and interests in top shape.

Tips On Buying A New Trombone

Finding your next instrument can be a daunting task if you don’t have a game plan. The market is filled with a plethora of options, and sometimes it can be difficult to see the forest through the trees.From my time at Paige’s Music and my experience as a player, I can provide my thought process, and hopefully it will help with your future instrument selection.

Start by playing on your instrument.

Always, always, always limit the variables. Bring your current instrument and mouthpiece as well as familiar music. Warm up on your instrument and take note of how it sounds in the space around you. You need to have a control for the experiment, and your current instrument will provide that. Take out uncertainties like unfamiliar music, unfamiliar mouthpieces, and etc.

S.E. Shires Q Series Trombones Now At Paige’s Music

Paige’s Music is happy to announce that we are now carrying S.E. Shires Q Series trombones. These remarkable instruments bring the extraordinary S.E. Shires sound and craftsmanship to a more ordinary price point. The modular components of the Q Series trombones are fully compatible with S.E. Shires Custom trombones. This means that any musicians wanting to further explore their equipment options in the future will be free to do so without limitations. We are currently stocking the Model TBQ30YA and Model TBQ36YR, but please don’t hesitate to contact us about anything else within the S.E. Shires line up.

Here is what the manufacturer has to say about these fine instruments:

Your student wants to play in the school band, and now you need to get an instrument. What do you need to know?

Choosing a student’s first instrument can be a daunting task. The internet is flooded with all kinds of instruments of varying qualities and prices. I like to think that instruments fit within one of four distinct categories: cheap instrument-shaped objects, viable student model instruments for beginners, intermediate instruments for the advancing player, and professional models for the musician who needs the best instrument available.

Set your child (and yourself) up for success.