Care & Maintenance Posts

How To Keep Your Trumpet Clean

To further clean your instrument remove all valves, slides and caps from the trumpet. You may submerge the trumpet in warm water (should be noticeably warm but not scalding hot) with mild dish soap such as dawn. Let the instrument sit for five minutes and then use your valve casing brush and snake brush to remove excess dirt and debris from the trumpet. Absolutely DO NOT force the brushes into smaller spaces such as the valve ports or the ends of smaller tuning slides. The crook ends of the 1st and third valve tuning slides can be cleaned by running water through them.

Once all easily accessible areas of the trumpet have been scrubbed thoroughly rinse the trumpet in warm clean water and let air dry. Once the trumpet is dry you may then apply your necessary lubricants to moving parts and reassemble. Stay safe!

You can count on us to help you keep making music!

 

Welcome to Paige's Music

We know there is uncertainty right now, but the team at Paige’s Music is ready to help you keep making music!

  1. We will remain open regular hours unless we are mandated to close. Please follow us on our social media channels for updates.
  2. Since many school schedules are interrupted, please contact us with any questions or needs you may have and we will find a way to help you!
  3. We are taking extra precautions on top of our already very high sanitary standards to keep every instrument clean & every staff member, customer & student safe.
  4. Here are some tips to help your student to keep their instrument clean & safe.

Please contact us with any questions that you may have.

Which Valve Oil Is Right For Me?

Choosing the right valve oil at Paige's Music

At Paige’s Music, we are frequently asked “what valve oil do you recommend”? This answer can vary depending on the type and age of instrument as well as specific player preferences. Here is a short overview of our most popular options.

Let It Snow, Let It Snow, Let It Snow

Well, it’s Indiana…and we never know when winter is going to show up, and it looks like at least the snow has decided to pay us an early visit this year. So we want to take a moment to remind you that the cold can cause some serious issues with your instrument if you are not taking proper care of it. Below are a few tips to help protect your instrument over the next several months…

Basic Tips On Caring For Your Oboe

Last summer we updated the care videos for several of the beginning instruments available on our Debut Rental Program. Below is the general care and maintenance video for oboes, with instruction given by Erin Nichols of the Indy Flute Shop.

Basic Tips On Caring For Your Clarinet

Last summer we updated the care videos for several of the beginning instruments available on our Debut Rental Program. With back-to-school time in full swing, we thought it would be a good time to share these again.  Below is the general care and maintenance video, with instruction given by Sam Motter of our Retail Sales staff.

If you’d like to see the rest of our clarinet videos, you can view them on our Clarinet Care & Maintenance page.

Heat, High Humidity, and String Instruments

Regina in Encore Orchestral Strings has some great advice for all of the string players out there.  Keep reading!

We’re approaching the time of year where temperatures are averaging above 75 degrees Fahrenheit with high humidity levels in Indiana. We all know that cold winters present it’s own challenges, but the summer heat can create just as many issues. Wood is an organic material that will always react to the temperature, which is why we have to be careful about where the instrument is being stored.

We have seen fingerboards come unglued, necks pop out of place, and varnish essentially melt. With the high levels of humidity and scorching temperatures that we endure in Indiana, you want to be careful with how you store your instrument and where it is being stored. One of the most common scenarios that we hear about from our customers involves leaving an instrument in the car on a hot summer day.

No matter what the temperature outside is, it is safest to bring the instrument inside with you wherever you are. We recently had a cello come in that suffered quite a bit of cosmetic damage due to it being left in a hot car for an extended amount of time. Not only was the varnish ruined by the heat, but the cello itself was stuck to the inside of the case which caused even more damage to the back of the instrument. My best advice to give is to keep your instrument close to you… if you’re uncomfortable with the temperature where your instrument is being stored, more than likely the instrument is uncomfortable too!

Have a look to see what an excessive amount of heat can do to a cello:

Using Pegs To Tune Your String Instrument

Tuning an instrument equipped with pegs instead of tuning machines can be a frustrating task when problems are present.

First of all the strings must be in good condition. Worn or frayed strings cannot be tuned well.

It is essential that the pegs be fitted well, and lightly lubricated if needed. Use peg dope or peg compound when the pegs squeak when turned. No lubrication is preferable to too much. “Peg Drops” is a useful product for a quick, temporary fix to slipping pegs.

When the peg is first turned, it is good to feel and/or hear a click.  This tells us that the peg will stick correctly after tuning.  After the click, the peg should turn smoothly.

The peg is fitted on a taper with the thicker end toward the peg head. It is the nature of this tapered peg to push its way out.  The string will quickly unwind if this is allowed to happen.  It is also essential that the pegs be held in while tuning.  If you have to hold the instrument with both hands and push the peg in very hard in order to get them to stick, or if your pegs are constantly slipping, consider taking the instrument to our shop for correction and adjustment.  Firmly holding the pegs in while turning should suffice.

If the string is just a half step or less off, just use the fine tuners.  

Pegs whose string holes are too far to the wrong side of the peg box can and will keep the pegs from being held in.  These pegs must have new string holes drilled in order to function correctly.  This is a delicate process best handled by a luthier/string technician.   

 Paige’s stringed instrument repair shop is here to help you keep your instrument in its best condition.  Play well and enjoy!