FAQs Posts

Need to rent a school band or orchestra instrument? We’re here to help!

School Band and Orchestra Rentals at Paige's Music

It’s the beginning of August. The sun is shining, the wind is warm, it’s the height of summer. In Indiana, school is starting. For many students, this means that English, math, biology, history come roaring back from the long summer. For a growing number of students, this also means the beginning of the musician’s journey!

At Paige’s Music, we have partnered with many schools throughout the state to become the supplier of school band and orchestra instruments. For many families, the easiest option is to rent. Renting with Paige’s Music is a great opportunity to participate in music-making. We make rental easy and convenient and provide you with peace of mind.

All of our band and orchestra rentals include free repair and replacement, free deliveries and pick-up, exchange, return, and early purchase discount options.

We have several convenient options for renting an instrument on our Debut Rental plan.

School Is Ending – Should I Return My Instrument to Paige’s Music

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As we near the end of the school year, one of the questions on a band parent’s mind is, “What do we do with my student’s instrument?” There are a couple of answers to this, but we can help you answer them.

First, you need to find out if your student plans to play again next year. If the answer to this is “yes” then you don’t need to do anything. Your student will bring the instrument home on the last day of school. This will give them the ability to play it all summer long. There are many online resources that they can utilize to make their playing even better while they are at home. The best part about it is that you student will be able to play whatever music they choose and they will go back in the fall an even better player than they were at the end of May.

If your student has decided that they are not going to participate in the music program next year, we make getting their instrument back to use easy as well. Here is a video that explains exactly how to get it back to us.

 

If you have any questions, please contact us at 1-800-382-1099 or by email at sales@paigesmusic.com.

What Are The Advantages of an Advanced Trombone? – FAQs

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Yamaha YSL-882O

Currently, Paige’s Music offers a variety of professional-level trombones, including models from Bach, Conn, and Yamaha. All of these horns feature thicker brass, a large bore, and professional level-craftsmanship. These trombones also feature an F-Attachment.

F-Attachment

The F Attachment allows for greater flexibility in how to approach the lower ranges of the trombone. While a standard tenor trombone can only go to E under the staff and the lower pedal tone series, F attachment provides a bridge to the pedal range.

In addition to providing this extended range, the F-Attachment also allows the performer greater flexibility in approaching technical passages in when moving the slide long distances is not always practical.

F-attachments come configured in two different ways: a closed wrap and an open wrap. This concerns the physical shape of the tubing. A closed wrap coils around itself while an open wrap features long, straight tubing shaped like the slide.

One of the main differences between a closed wrap and an open wrap is clarity. As the name suggests, an open wrap tends to be clearer and more resonant than a closed wrap. A closed wrap doesn’t offer quite the same clarity as an open wrap, but it takes up less space and generally offers more resistance than the open wrap.

An F-Attachment does require the performer to tune each note with more care and make bigger adjustments with the slide. Generally, the F-Attachment can cause low notes to be on the sharp side, so the slide must be further beyond the “normal” position. For example, using the trigger and a “normal” 4th position would cause the D below the staff to be very sharp, this can be fixed by simply putting the slide close to the 5th position. When going out to the low B natural, you run out of slide and are forced to make an adjustment by opening the embouchure and forcing the pitch down.

Larger Bore

Another advantage of more advanced trombones is the larger bore. A larger bore generally allows for more air to pass through the instrument providing a warmer, darker sound often desired in orchestral, symphonic, and wind ensemble repertoire. The larger bore also allows the lower range of the instrument to be fuller.
In moving from a small bore to a larger bore instrument, there is a learning curve as the instrument will feel different. Practice will allow you to grow into these changes.

Craftsmanship

One of the major factors in what makes an advanced or professional trombone standout from a student model is the level of craftsmanship. High-quality trombones feature a hybrid of production methods utilizing the best technology for precision engineering and the artistry of great craftsmanship to make for the best possible experience in both sound and quality. One example of this craftsmanship is the manufacturing of the bell. Many high-quality trombones feature a hand-hammered bell while most slides are aligned using computers to make sure the inner and outer slides fit perfectly, providing the best possible slide action.

Final Thoughts

When it comes to choosing the right trombone, the best advice Paige’s Music can give is to try out trombones. Spend quality time with each instrument and figure out what you like and what you don’t like! Ask questions like:

“What kind of tone do I want?”
“Do I prefer less resistance or more resistance?”
“Does this trombone provide the slide I need for technical passages?”
“Does this trombone provide extra security in higher range?”
“Do I want a closed wrap or open wrap F-attachment?”

Quality time spent playing each instrument will help you discern what you like and what you don’t like and is the most important factor in choosing the right instrument for you!

Which Instrument Is Right For My Student? – FAQs

Beginner band season is right around the corner! As we prepare for the summer time rush, we begin to hear a lot of concerns from parents regarding which instrument their student should choose. Since many are first-time band parents, there are many questions regarding how to choose an instrument their child is going to enjoy learning while not being so difficult the student becomes discouraged. We at Paige’s are here to say, “Fear not!” We can give you a few helpful tips to quell your worries.

1. First things first – Try them out!

Like many aspects of playing any musical instrument, one of the best ways to find how you like something is to is get it physically in your hands. Several of our schools in Indiana have try-out periods during the 5th grade year where Paige’s will deliver a test set with at least one of every instrument we sell or rent. Typically, the student will get a chance to try the instruments during class with a teacher to get a sense of what each instrument sounds and feels like. If your student is still not sure of a definite instrument or did not get a chance to try instruments with their teacher, you are always welcome to try instruments in our store. There is no appointment necessary; feel free to come in during regular business hours and our sales staff will help you. Please note the student’s teacher can also help the student make a decision at try-out time.

2. “Is ______ difficult in general to play?”

We often hear this concern from parents of new band students. They do not want their child to struggle with an instrument that is too hard to play. The answer to this question is really, “It depends on the player.” For example, when I was trying instruments in the 5th grade to prepare for middle school band I tried all the woodwind instruments. I made a small amount of sound on a couple of them, but I was really not sure which woodwind I wanted to play. Before this, I had never really considered the brass section, but for a change of pace I decided to give trumpet a shot. Turns out, brass was perfect for me! I was able to produce a trumpet sound after only a couple of tries.
There are many musicians who could tell similar stories. Where I have always struggled with woodwind instruments, I have friends who are the complete opposite (they struggled with brass, but excelled at woodwinds). Which instrument is right for one student may not work for another. Attitude, and physical aspects like embouchure and the player’s lips, can make a difference for the student and what feels best. And, as always, the best way to improve on ANY instrument is to Practice, Practice, Practice!

3. Paige’s Music Rental Easy Exchange Policy

Even after your student has tried the instruments and made a decision, your student or teacher may feel like different instrument is better. Maybe they find the sound of another instrument is more to their liking or that their instrument is a little more difficult than they anticipated. Don’t worry! Paige’s Music has an Easy Exchange Policy. If you are renting from us and need to exchange to a different instrument, we can take up to 18 months of rental payments and put them towards the cost of a different instrument. We can even send the new instrument to your student’s school and pick up your first instrument for return.

It can be nerve-wracking thinking of choosing just the right instrument to play, but Paige’s Music is committed to making the decision making process as painless and worry-free as possible. We hope the tips above have helped you and your beginning music student as they begin trying instruments. If you ever have further questions or concerns, please feel free to visit our store, email, or call toll free at 1-800-382-1099 and we will be happy to help you!

The Who, What, Where, When and Why of Private Lessons

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You have probably at some point heard your student’s teacher, a Paige’s Music sales rep, or even your student mention taking private lessons. There are many factors to consider when deciding upon private lessons and a private lessons teacher. The goal of this article is to help you make an educated decision when it comes to private lessons.

First, you might be wondering, who are private lessons instructors? Private lessons teachers are typically professionally trained musicians who are proficient at one or more instruments. Anyone who is skillful, has a good knowledge of music theory as well as basic teaching methods can become a private instructor. These individuals often teach students ranging from beginner to advanced skill levels.

Next, what do private instructors do? As you can almost certainly assume private instructors provide a one-on-one teaching environment for a student. More specifically, they can focus on playing technique, tonal quality, precise excerpts or music the student might be playing in class or even individual solo pieces for contest. They are able to provide direct and immediate feedback to the student helping them implement the best overall performance standards.

There are a few places where you can inquire about finding a private instructor for your student. Our first recommendation is always to speak to the student’s band or orchestra teacher at school. They may have a preferred list of private instructors they have worked with in the past and would be comfortable referring you. Another place to search is the Paige’s Music website. We do provide a list of private instructors categorized by instrument for your convenience. Private lessons can take place at the student’s school, your home or the private instructor’s home.

Another common question we get asked at Paige’s is when should parents start their students in private lessons? While we would all like to respond with a resounding “NOW”, the answer might not be so simple. It really depends on the student and their needs. For example, if your student is struggling with their new instrument, it might benefit them to get some one-on-one instruction from someone more adept on their instrument. Additionally, many students consider private lessons further into their playing careers as a way of focusing on more specific techniques that sometimes are not covered in general band or orchestra class. Private lessons are often essential for students wanting to participate in solo and ensemble competitions or auditions for outside groups or college. Again, the student’s band or orchestra teacher is your best resource for determining if private lessons would benefit your student.

Finally, why private lessons? The answer is simple, to help your student get better. As discussed before, private lessons provide a professional environment for your student to get focused help with all aspects of playing their band or orchestra instrument. Whether your student is just starting out or is searching for more advanced instruction, there is always something to learn through individual, private lessons.