General Posts

Join Our Team!

Paige’s Music is hiring for multiple positions within our Retail Sales department!

Desired Skills and Qualifications:

  • Bachelor’s degree preferably in music education, business, performance, or equivalent
  • Background in instrumental music (band and/or orchestra)
  • Excellent oral, written, interpersonal, and organization skills

Candidates with the following skills and qualifications will be more favorably considered:

  • Loves “puppy parties”
  • Enjoys the occasional after-work dinner with coworkers (preferably tacos)
  • Willingness to participate in local trivia nights
  • Open to working with sports fanatics, movie buffs, audiophiles, foodies, gym junkies, hikers, and mountain bikers
  • Passionate about having a genuinely good time with some genuinely good folks

More specifics can be found through the links below, but if you’re already sold (see what I did there) email me your resume at cwhittington@pagiesmusic.com. I look forward to meeting you!

 

Retail Sales Associate
https://www.paigesmusic.com/paiges/run?id=6&_jlid=6929&lvid=557

 

Retail Sales Specialist – Clarinet
https://www.paigesmusic.com/paiges/run?id=6&_jlid=6853&lvid=557

 

Retail Sales Specialist – Saxophone
https://www.paigesmusic.com/paiges/run?id=6&_jlid=6930&lvid=557

Is competition in music a good thing?

Perhaps there is more to life than winning first chair, winning the gold medal in ISSMA Orchestra competition, or winning the Bands of America Grand National Championship. In my time as a musician from middle school through the collegiate level I often heard that music is not a competition. This has come from parents and teachers who want to believe that music education is solely about art. Several studies that indicate the study of music helps students become more creative, more intelligent, etc. (You can find these on our Monday posts titled “Truth in Music Education”). Artistry and intelligence is important, so is preparing for the competition that is everyday life. Perhaps artistry and intelligence are source of the “good life” but make no mistake that one must prepare for the stresses and strains of modern life. I fully believe that the competitive component of music education is one of the most important learning experiences every student can have.

S.E. Shires Q Series Trombones Now At Paige’s Music

Paige’s Music is happy to announce that we are now carrying S.E. Shires Q Series trombones. These remarkable instruments bring the extraordinary S.E. Shires sound and craftsmanship to a more ordinary price point. The modular components of the Q Series trombones are fully compatible with S.E. Shires Custom trombones. This means that any musicians wanting to further explore their equipment options in the future will be free to do so without limitations. We are currently stocking the Model TBQ30YA and Model TBQ36YR, but please don’t hesitate to contact us about anything else within the S.E. Shires line up.

Here is what the manufacturer has to say about these fine instruments:

Basic Tuning Tips for Brass Instruments

main-tuning-slide

All brass instruments come with slides that move. The largest one is the “main tuning slide”. The others are used to tune individual notes. Some may need to be pulled out to make the instrument flatter, others are pushed in to make the instrument sharper. In the case of trombones, not only is there a “main tuning slide” but each note can be tuned by using the hand slide.

Product Feature: Bach Stradivarius New York 190S43W2 Centennial B-flat Trumpet

New to the Paige’s Music inventory and directly from the Conn-Selmer factory in Elkhart, Indiana, is the Bach Stradivarius New York 190S43W2 Centennial B-flat Trumpet!

2018 represents 100 years since the legendary Vincent Bach began his instrument manufacturing legacy. From the early beginnings of mouthpiece manufacturing, to the great horns that have come out of Mt. Vernon, NY and Elkhart, IN locations, the Vincent Bach brand is one of the most highly regarded in the industry.  Available ONLY in the year 2018, the 190S43W2 commemorates this anniversary with a number of functional and aesthetic modifications to the standard 190S43 model.

 

Playing and Production Features:

  • Professional #43 bell with a side-seam resulting in a quick response and a brilliant tone
  • Combination of two-piece valve construction, nickel silver outer slides, brass valve guides, and a steel bell wire provides a broad sound with a quick response and great feedback to the player
  • A .459″ medium-large bore produces a well-rounded sound for all types of music
  • Round steel bell wire allows for great projection and sound quality

 

Commemorative Features:

  • 24k gold trim on valves, 3rdvalve slide rod stop, and tuning slide water key
  • 100thanniversary custom engraving on the bell
  • “100 years” commemorative stamp on 2ndvalve casing
  • Custom 100thanniversary wood-shell trumpet case with a burgundy interior and commemorative case badge

Having personally played this horn on several occasions, there is just a sense of ease and control that comes with it. Nothing feels forced, response is immediate, there is a noticeable difference in the vibration influenced by the side-seamed bell as opposed to the bottom-seam on standard models, and the tone is exactly as the description reads… BRILLIANT!

Anyone is welcome to come into the store at any time to try out this outstanding trumpet and consider owning a piece of Vincent Bach history.

D’Addario Alto Sax Rico Reserve Mouthpieces at Paige’s Music

We’re excited to announce that we’re now carrying D’addario’s line of Reserve mouthpieces for Alto Saxophone! The MJR-D145, MJR-D150, and MJR-D155 all feature an innovative oval chamber, producing an excellent response and full, dark tone character.

While D’addario beta tested the prototype models by shipping them to over 100 artists, teachers, and students, I was fortunate enough to get to spend some time on each one of them personally, and was very impressed by the results.

Tenon Rings on Woodwind instruments

Tenon rings on woodwind instruments are not there just for decoration. They help support the thinness of the wood in the tenon socket itself. During our dry winter weather it is important to make sure they are on tight and not loose and falling off. If they are loose it can lead to cracks in the wood or even breaking the socket while assembling/disassembling your instrument. If you find that the tenon rings on your instrument are loose, please make sure and send your instrument in to have them refit.

This can help prevent a more costly repair down the road.

 

If you’d like to read some more cold weather tips, you can read the article below:

http://news.paigesmusic.com/be-prepared-for-cold-weather-and-contest-season/

Preparing A Solo

 

Welcome back from winter break! I hope you enjoyed your time off and are ready to tackle Solo & Ensemble.

Much of the performance year is focused on group ensembles but ISSMA Solo and Ensemble gives you a great opportunity to focus on your individual playing. Mastering solos is an essential part of every musician’s career. Solos are a great way to improve your technical and expressive musical qualities and a great opportunity to become confident performing by yourself in front of others.

Practicing and performing solos requires a great deal of discipline. Unlike your band or orchestra class, you have to make time to not only practice your solo, but you need to schedule practice times with your accompanist, make sure that you know every part of your solo, and you have to balance this with any other activity (such as another ensemble) musical or otherwise.

Here are a few tips to get the most out of your solo:

  1. Master the notes and rhythms. This advice may seem basic but the first step in performing at the highest level is to master the basic components of the piece. In addition to notes and rhythm, work hard on making every note sound great!
  2. One you master the notes and rhythms, experiment with tempos in various sections. Part of a great solo (and general musicianship) is to have control over changes in tempo. While being able to stay with a metronome is important in practice, your performance will be much more musical if you allow tempos to fluctuate. Now this doesn’t mean change tempos whenever you want, rather, follow the various tempo markings throughout the piece but don’t be afraid to make the changes dramatic.
  3. Like the previous tip, don’t be afraid to be dramatic with dynamics. In a solo, you have to provide all of the dynamic (volume) changes, so if it’s a forte, make sure it’s dramatically different from piano.
  4. Work with your accompanist and make sure you are on the same page when it comes to tempos, dynamics and playing in sync with one another. The more you practice with your accompanist, the more natural the performance will be!
  5. As always, practice exactly how you want to perform. Never change the way you play when it’s a performance situation.

One final tip is to work on your solo with a private instructor. A private instructor will push you hard and will be able to help you master your instrument with their extreme attention to every aspect of your playing. They can also assist you with the above tips and getting the most out of your solo!