Mouthpieces Posts

Jazz Mouthpiece Recommendations for Saxophone

When looking for a new mouthpiece I think it is a great idea to try out a few mouthpieces before you decide on making the purchase. I have some recommendations for jazz mouthpieces that will help the development of a quality jazz sound. I believe that starting out on a hard rubber jazz mouthpiece will help develop a strong sound and feel for the jazz mouthpieces.

If you are just getting started in jazz band I would recommend trying out some Meyer and Otto Link mouthpieces preferably the hard rubber. These mouthpieces are not only great for beginners, but more advanced players as well. If you are a little bit more advanced with jazz music. I would highly recommend trying out the Vandoren V16 M/S+, Daddario Jazz Select (pictured), or Jody Jazz Hr*. These mouthpieces are high quality and reasonably priced!

Please reach out to me if you have any questions!

Woodwind Classical Mouthpiece Recommendations

When looking for a new mouthpiece I think it is a great idea to try out a few mouthpieces before you decide on making the purchase. I have some recommendations for classical mouthpieces. These mouthpieces will suit playing in a concert band or solo setting.

Saxophone Mouthpieces – Jazz versus Classical

Selmer C* (left/classical) – Vandoren V16 (right/jazz)

When talking about jazz and classical mouthpieces I believe that you first need to understand the major sound difference between the two genres of music.

Woodwind Mouthpieces Explained

Woodwind mouthpieces have several crucial parts that work together with the reed to produce the sound from your instrument.  Read on to learn about the various parts and how they might effect your choice of reeds!

Two Of A Perfect Pair

I feel like I talk about mouthpieces WAY too much. And you know what they say; “The first step to solving a problem is admitting you have one!” At one point I definitely had 70 mouthpieces of all different sizes with different purposes and I would just try to make things work even if they didn’t want to, which I now realize is the wrong way to go about selecting equipment. This brings me to a very important topic and an anecdote to help try to prove my case. I bought a very specific, specialized trumpet from a friend that was designed to be an orchestral Bb and pair well with the matching C trumpet model in this brand’s line. Now, I truly believe there isn’t much this horn can’t do, but I definitely feel that it favors larger mouthpieces in general to achieve the purpose for which it was built. There are many factors to consider such as bore size, bell, leadpipe, and instrument weight, as well as many others.  I’ll take a few horns and give some examples of mouthpieces that might work well with it and why.

When to Buy Which Trumpet? Jazz/Commercial Edition

I’ve got some news for everyone: I am a trumpet junkie. I have always been fascinated by different brands and models and have even experienced many cases of FOMO (fear of missing out) when it comes to my equipment. I’ve taught several students and have had to have this conversation many times and have even asked for personal recommendations. Today is just a quick look at what instruments you should purchase and when, depending upon your musical path. While it is super difficult to give a recommendation without hearing people play or know what their interests are, I will give some fairly general model recommendations from the “Big Three” brands of trumpets along with a few special suggestions when needed. Today we will discuss instruments needed for those who want to primarily be Jazz/Commercial players and they will be in order of importance. (Your timeline may vary. Please consult your teacher/professor on when it is appropriate to purchase these instruments)

The Case Against Beginner Buzzing

To start with, this is not an anti-buzzing campaign. Over my years of working with students whether it be privately, in group settings, or even observing other teachers working with them I have come to a conclusion: I think having your beginning trumpet players mouthpiece buzz is harmful to their development. Here’s why.

Mouthpieces and how to choose, “Unpopular Opinion Edition”

Raise your hand if you’ve had a band teacher or private instructor tell you that you needed to go from your 7C to a 5C, then to a 3C, then to a 1-1/2C and so on and so forth. Ok, now that we’ve all put our hands up, let’s get down to my unpopular opinion: There is no set progression for mouthpieces. They are not like shoes where you start with a size 5 and eventually get up to a size 12.

As discussed earlier on October 3rd, 2019; we talked about some factors that help us choose mouthpieces. Today we will briefly discuss a couple of those and other things to think about when testing mouthpieces.