Repair Posts

Take Care of Your Instrument This Summer

It’s that time of year….you’ve played your final concert of the year, marching band doesn’t start for a while, and school is out for the summer. Time to recharge and refresh. And now is the perfect time to send in your instrument for a little refreshing as well!

We recommend that you send your instrument in for a check-up at least 2 times a year to keep it in proper playing condition. And what better time to do that then during summer break while you may have some down time. And if you need a loaner to use while we have your instrument, we have you covered.*

Bring your instrument by our store M-F 10-6 and Sat. 10-4, or give us a call to see if we have visits scheduled for your school over the summer. Have questions? Call us at 1.577.3415 or drop us an email at repair@paigesmusic.com.

Enjoy your time off and don’t forget to practice!

*Loaner instruments guaranteed for all active rentals and service policies only. Loaners for general repair customers dependent upon our loaner instrument inventory.

Paige’s Music Repair Shop – Behind The Scenes

Ever wonder what goes on “behind the scenes” when your instrument needs repaired? We recently updated our video highlighting our experienced staff, cutting edge tools and advanced machinery.

When your instrument needs repair, Paige’s Music has the premier repair facility in the state ready and waiting to get your instrument back up and playing. Woodwind , brass, percussion, and string instruments are all covered in our state of the art facility. Watch the video above to take a tour of our shop, and see why our repair facility offers the best repairs at the best prices in Indiana.

Repair Shop Tales – Kids and a Kanstul Trumpet

Every once in a while, we get in repairs that we just have to share. We recently had a trumpet brought in that the customer thought was possibly “beyond repair”. But we assured them that our shop has performed many “miracles” in the past and they might be surprised what we can do. Here is their review after receiving the instrument back…

Using Pegs To Tune Your String Instrument

Tuning an instrument equipped with pegs instead of tuning machines can be a frustrating task when problems are present.

First of all the strings must be in good condition. Worn or frayed strings cannot be tuned well.

It is essential that the pegs be fitted well, and lightly lubricated if needed. Use peg dope or peg compound when the pegs squeak when turned. No lubrication is preferable to too much. “Peg Drops” is a useful product for a quick, temporary fix to slipping pegs.

When the peg is first turned, it is good to feel and/or hear a click.  This tells us that the peg will stick correctly after tuning.  After the click, the peg should turn smoothly.

The peg is fitted on a taper with the thicker end toward the peg head. It is the nature of this tapered peg to push its way out.  The string will quickly unwind if this is allowed to happen.  It is also essential that the pegs be held in while tuning.  If you have to hold the instrument with both hands and push the peg in very hard in order to get them to stick, or if your pegs are constantly slipping, consider taking the instrument to our shop for correction and adjustment.  Firmly holding the pegs in while turning should suffice.

If the string is just a half step or less off, just use the fine tuners.  

Pegs whose string holes are too far to the wrong side of the peg box can and will keep the pegs from being held in.  These pegs must have new string holes drilled in order to function correctly.  This is a delicate process best handled by a luthier/string technician.   

 Paige’s stringed instrument repair shop is here to help you keep your instrument in its best condition.  Play well and enjoy!

Contest Season Is Coming Soon – Is Your Instrument Ready?

 

It’s not too late, but time is running out. Contest Season is almost here!

January through April is a really busy time of year for school music students. Many of the annual contests and festivals happen during this time of the year. These include:

  • Solo & Ensemble Contest
  • Jazz Band Festival
  • Junior/Middle School Organizational Festivals
  • High School Organizational Festivals

Your performance level and the success of your organization depend on a properly playing instrument. If your instrument has not been looked over by a technician in the last 6 months you may be overdue.

Send your instrument in for proper maintenance to help avoid small problems from turning into something larger at an inappropriate time. It could help you get to the next level during the upcoming contest season.

If you’d like to send your instrument in for us to check, we have a step-by-step guide on how to do that right here.

As always, please give us a call if you have any questions.

1-800-382-1099

Musical Instruments and Super Glue Don’t Mix

no-glue

 

We posted this a few years ago, but this has come up again a few times here recently.  So, we thought we’d pass this information along again!

CA glue is an ingenious product for certain applications. It is commonly called Super Glue or Krazy Glue, among other labels.   For orchestral or any musical instrument, it is dangerous and strictly taboo. A recent violin repair came in with bridge problems. The bridge was “loose” and had been superglued to the top. The result was a poor bond that failed and left a hard mess on the bridge and the violin finish. The bridge had to be replaced. Before this could be done, the CA glue on the finish needed to be removed. This is a tediously complicated and expensive task that is nearly impossible to accomplish without damage to the finish.

The bridge is meant to be held in place with string pressure and must not be glued to the top. CA glue, used anywhere on instruments will cause damage that is nearly always permanent, and is unnecessary. Please never, ever use CA glue on your instrument.

We also have band instruments come in quite often that have been super glued back together. Never a good idea! Super glue will never hold a post on or fix a tuning slide that has come apart. They must be soldered back together. Super glue is dangerous to remove and will also damage the finish on the instrument. Again, please never, ever use super glue on your instrument.

The technicians at Paige’s Music are here to help you solve playing condition problems professionally, enhancing the sound of your instrument and playing. Bring it to us. We are happy to help!

What To Do When Your Mouthpiece Gets Stuck

This is a repeat from November of 2016, but always relevant with each new beginning class of students.  Please let us know if you need help with a stuck mouthpiece!

While at first glance removing a stuck mouthpiece can look fairly simple, it can be anything but.

The mouthpiece shank and the receiver both have specific tapers so the mouthpiece fits snug and doesn’t wiggle or leak air while playing. The mouthpiece may be stuck due to damage to the shank or the receiver. It might be dirty or it may have just been jammed on too tight.

In any scenario the proper way to remove the stuck mouthpiece without damage is to use a mouthpiece puller. There are many different pullers available on the market but the one we use here is a Bobcat or Accent brand.

You adjust the tool, with the screws, so that one side of the puller is pressing against the end of the receiver and the other side is pulling against the bottom of the mouthpiece cup.

Should My Bridge Be Bent Like This?

cello-bad

Your bridge is an important component on your stringed instrument.  It is critically important to the sound, and playability.  It is a beautiful thing when it is right and an obstacle when it is not.  A warped bridge is not correct.  Even a slight warp will cause intonation problems.  The front of the bridge gives the impression of a lean toward the tailpiece.  It is shaped this way to give it the correct thickness, weight and to add to the beauty of the instrument. The back of the bridge should be perpendicular to the top of the instrument.