Repair Posts

Repair Shop Tales – From Trash To Treasure

Every once in a while, we get in repairs that we just have to share.  For our latest installment, we recently had a cornet brought in that was literally found on a trash pile.  One of our highly skilled brass technicians, Sam Richards, performed his magic on this instrument and brought it back to its original beauty.  Here is the customer’s review after receiving the instrument back…

 

Look at this beauty.  It is an E. A. Couturier, made in 1918.  It is a Bb and an A cornet.  It has a turn key on the right side when rotated changes it from the Bb to the A.  It was given to me about 4 years ago by a friend that retrieved it from the trash pile.  He said he didn’t know if it was any good.  I could play it some but it needed work to play correctly.  Thank you to Mr Kevin Cottrell from the Seymour High School for suggesting sending it to Paige’s Music.  They had it only a week and I got it back today.  They did an AWESOME job bringing this old cornet back to life.  I am extremely happy with the service and thrilled to have this beautiful antique sounding as it did 101 years ago.

 

Below are a couple of pictures of the finished product the customer posted on social media.  We’re always up to a challenge here at Paige’s Music Repair, and in many circumstances are able to bring an instrument back to top playing condition, regardless of how badly it may have been damaged.  So no matter how big or how small, you can always trust the pros at Paige’s Music Repair to deliver high quality repairs at a competitive price!

Meet Becky Nash – Brass Technician at Paige’s Music

We’re very excited to introduce you to the latest addition to our brass technician staff in our repair shop, Becky Nash. Learn more about her by reading our quick Q&A with her below!

Position: Brass Technician

Start Date: May 2019

Training or Education:
Bachelors in Music Education from Drake University in Des Moines, IA

Band Instrument Repair Diploma from Red Wing (Minnesota State College – Southeast)

Where are you from originally:
Pekin, IL

What instruments do you play:
Trumpet

What do you enjoy most about being a technician:
I love the variety of instruments and repairs I see. No two horns are the same, no damage is the same and it’s my job to find the solution.

What is the most unusual repair you’ve had to deal with:
Finding fuzzy mold on trumpet pistons is always fun, but I think the most interesting thing I’ve witnessed is a trombone slide that not only had a pencil shoved all the way down to the crook, but also a battery. Needless to say, the slide had to come apart. Yikes.

What is your most memorable musical experience:
In college, a group of us decided to pile in a car (a car that couldn’t go faster than 55mph without shaking) and drive the 6 hours to Chicago to watch the CSO play a Sunday matinee of the Rite of Spring. It was fantastic.

How Do I Get My Instrument Repaired? – FAQ

Sending an instrument into Paige’s Music for repair is a very easy process. Here’s what you need to do:

It’s Vintage: Restoring a Ludwig Drum Set

Brian Travelsted in our repair shop recently restored a Ludwig drum set.  Below he tells the steps he had to go through to bring this great instrument back to life.

Every once in a while we will get a call from a customer that is somewhat out of the ordinary.  I recently visited a local summer camp that had a few drum sets that were in need of some work.  When I arrived to inspect the drums I was able to piece back together two drum sets that needed new heads and cleaned.  I was not expecting to find a vintage set of drums. The 1967 Ludwig Club Date that I found had all the original parts except for the cymbal arm and a hoop on the mounted tom.  While I knew it would be a challenge, I was determined to make these drums look and sound great again.  Below is a basic breakdown of the steps taken to get the drums back into excellent condition.

Take Care of Your Instrument This Summer

It’s that time of year….you’ve played your final concert of the year, marching band doesn’t start for a while, and school is out for the summer. Time to recharge and refresh. And now is the perfect time to send in your instrument for a little refreshing as well!

We recommend that you send your instrument in for a check-up at least 2 times a year to keep it in proper playing condition. And what better time to do that then during summer break while you may have some down time. And if you need a loaner to use while we have your instrument, we have you covered.*

Bring your instrument by our store M-F 10-6 and Sat. 10-4, or give us a call to see if we have visits scheduled for your school over the summer. Have questions? Call us at 1.577.3415 or drop us an email at repair@paigesmusic.com.

Enjoy your time off and don’t forget to practice!

*Loaner instruments guaranteed for all active rentals and service policies only. Loaners for general repair customers dependent upon our loaner instrument inventory.

Paige’s Music Repair Shop – Behind The Scenes

Ever wonder what goes on “behind the scenes” when your instrument needs repaired? We recently updated our video highlighting our experienced staff, cutting edge tools and advanced machinery.

When your instrument needs repair, Paige’s Music has the premier repair facility in the state ready and waiting to get your instrument back up and playing. Woodwind , brass, percussion, and string instruments are all covered in our state of the art facility. Watch the video above to take a tour of our shop, and see why our repair facility offers the best repairs at the best prices in Indiana.

Repair Shop Tales – Kids and a Kanstul Trumpet

Every once in a while, we get in repairs that we just have to share. We recently had a trumpet brought in that the customer thought was possibly “beyond repair”. But we assured them that our shop has performed many “miracles” in the past and they might be surprised what we can do. Here is their review after receiving the instrument back…

Using Pegs To Tune Your String Instrument

Tuning an instrument equipped with pegs instead of tuning machines can be a frustrating task when problems are present.

First of all the strings must be in good condition. Worn or frayed strings cannot be tuned well.

It is essential that the pegs be fitted well, and lightly lubricated if needed. Use peg dope or peg compound when the pegs squeak when turned. No lubrication is preferable to too much. “Peg Drops” is a useful product for a quick, temporary fix to slipping pegs.

When the peg is first turned, it is good to feel and/or hear a click.  This tells us that the peg will stick correctly after tuning.  After the click, the peg should turn smoothly.

The peg is fitted on a taper with the thicker end toward the peg head. It is the nature of this tapered peg to push its way out.  The string will quickly unwind if this is allowed to happen.  It is also essential that the pegs be held in while tuning.  If you have to hold the instrument with both hands and push the peg in very hard in order to get them to stick, or if your pegs are constantly slipping, consider taking the instrument to our shop for correction and adjustment.  Firmly holding the pegs in while turning should suffice.

If the string is just a half step or less off, just use the fine tuners.  

Pegs whose string holes are too far to the wrong side of the peg box can and will keep the pegs from being held in.  These pegs must have new string holes drilled in order to function correctly.  This is a delicate process best handled by a luthier/string technician.   

 Paige’s stringed instrument repair shop is here to help you keep your instrument in its best condition.  Play well and enjoy!