Repair Posts

What To Do When Your Mouthpiece Gets Stuck

This is a repeat from November of 2016, but always relevant with each new beginning class of students.  Please let us know if you need help with a stuck mouthpiece!

While at first glance removing a stuck mouthpiece can look fairly simple, it can be anything but.

The mouthpiece shank and the receiver both have specific tapers so the mouthpiece fits snug and doesn’t wiggle or leak air while playing. The mouthpiece may be stuck due to damage to the shank or the receiver. It might be dirty or it may have just been jammed on too tight.

In any scenario the proper way to remove the stuck mouthpiece without damage is to use a mouthpiece puller. There are many different pullers available on the market but the one we use here is a Bobcat or Accent brand.

You adjust the tool, with the screws, so that one side of the puller is pressing against the end of the receiver and the other side is pulling against the bottom of the mouthpiece cup.

Should My Bridge Be Bent Like This?

cello-bad

Your bridge is an important component on your stringed instrument.  It is critically important to the sound, and playability.  It is a beautiful thing when it is right and an obstacle when it is not.  A warped bridge is not correct.  Even a slight warp will cause intonation problems.  The front of the bridge gives the impression of a lean toward the tailpiece.  It is shaped this way to give it the correct thickness, weight and to add to the beauty of the instrument. The back of the bridge should be perpendicular to the top of the instrument.

How Do I Send My Instrument In For Repair – FAQ

Sending an instrument into Paige’s Music for repair is a very easy process. Here’s what you need to do:

1. Call us at 1-800-382-1099 to let us know that your instrument needs service. We’ll arrange for a loaner to be sent to your school so your student isn’t without an instrument for class. TIP: You’ll need to keep your mouthpiece, bow, reeds, and cleaning items with you so that you’ll have them to use with the loaner until your instrument is returned to you.

2. See your director to fill out our repair tag. A properly filled out repair tag is of vital importance in processing your repair and getting it back to you in a timely matter. Here are a few things to keep in mind:

  • School name – Just an example: We call on seven schools with the name Lincoln in it. Important to have the complete name. Lincoln JH, Lincoln MS etc.
  • Students name- Important. Especially when last name is different from Parent’s
  • Parent’s name- Vital! When looking up contracts, billing etc.
  • Address – Vital
  • Parent’s email – for contacting with estimates or questions
  • Phone numbers – for contacting with estimates or questions
  • Specific problems – We always look over the entire instrument top to bottom when it comes in for repair. We want to make sure the instrument goes back in the best shape possible after repair. It always helpful to have anything specific notated here. That way the repair person has it right in front of them while they are checking your instrument in and will make sure to address your concerns.

3. Our District Manager will bring the loaner with him on his next visit to your school. He will also pick up your instrument and bring it back to the store for servicing. Most of the time your instrument will be returned to you the following week.

TIP: Make sure you take your mouthpiece, bow, reeds, and cleaning supplies out of the loaner and put them back i your original case once your instrument has returned to your school.

You can also do this online.

1. Go to our website at www.paigesmusic.com

2. Scroll down and click on “Service Request”

Get Your Instrument Serviced Over The Summer

Has it been a while since your instrument was in for a check-up? If summer is a down time for you and your playing time, then you should send your instrument in for a check-up. We recommend two visits each year to help keep your instrument in proper playing condition and the summer is the perfect time.

In fact, schools across the state will be sending in all kinds of school-owned instruments this summer to be cleaned, repaired, and refurbished so that they are ready to go for the next school year.

The best way to get your horn serviced during the summer is to bring it to the store. Our District Managers are visiting some schools during the summer, but not all schools and not every week. It’s very sporadic. The safe thing to do is call us first to see if arrangements can be made to drop off a loaner and pick up your instrument. You can call us at 1-800-337-0471.

Have a great rest of your summer and don’t forget to practice!

Tips On Caring For Your Trombone

Daily care and maintenance of your instrument is very important to how well your instrument performs. Watch this quick video below for a few, quick tips on caring for your trombone.

Our Very Own Ben Brummer Completes Straubinger Pad Certification Training

Ben Bruemmer

Congratulations to Ben Brummer! He has successfully completed training to become a certified Straubinger Pad Technician. These pads are specifically designed to be used in higher end professional flutes and require specialized training.

THE STRAUBINGER PAD CERTIFICATION TRAINING is an intensive three-day course, designed specifically to cover the concepts, methods of application, and procedures required to install Straubinger™ Pads correctly. This very specific training is designed exclusively for experienced repairmen.

Quick Tips On Clarinet Care

Daily care and maintenance of your instrument is very important to how well your instrument performs. Watch this quick video below for a few, quick tips on caring for your clarinet.

 

Cold Weather Tips For Your String Instrument

Today’s blog refers back to a previous blog about cold weather tips for string instruments from December of 2014. Walking through the shop one day last week I noticed all these instruments in clamps due to loose seams and/or cracks. Mostly caused by the bad cold weather spell we had recently. So as a reminder here is a repeat of that blog and some pictures of cause and effect.

Winter is here with its cold temps, snow, and low humidity. This scares the bejabbers out of any self-respecting stringed instrument. Can’t you just see or hear wood shrinking, pegs loosening, cracks splitting a top rib in two … These are sights and sounds that one might think would bring a smile to a repairman’s face. Winter time does create special problems for the violin family instruments, but good common sense care will reduce the number of unnecessary repairs.