Specialist Posts

How To Keep Your Trumpet Clean

To further clean your instrument remove all valves, slides and caps from the trumpet. You may submerge the trumpet in warm water (should be noticeably warm but not scalding hot) with mild dish soap such as dawn. Let the instrument sit for five minutes and then use your valve casing brush and snake brush to remove excess dirt and debris from the trumpet. Absolutely DO NOT force the brushes into smaller spaces such as the valve ports or the ends of smaller tuning slides. The crook ends of the 1st and third valve tuning slides can be cleaned by running water through them.

Once all easily accessible areas of the trumpet have been scrubbed thoroughly rinse the trumpet in warm clean water and let air dry. Once the trumpet is dry you may then apply your necessary lubricants to moving parts and reassemble. Stay safe!

Trombone Etiquette For A Healthy Musicician

Let’s face it. Germs are a hot button issue right now. We should all take proper precautions every day, but there are many things that trombonists let slide (pun absolutely intended. I’m not proud). Here are some very common and very avoidable issues that many brass players make. 

The Case Against Beginner Buzzing

To start with, this is not an anti-buzzing campaign. Over my years of working with students whether it be privately, in group settings, or even observing other teachers working with them I have come to a conclusion: I think having your beginning trumpet players mouthpiece buzz is harmful to their development. Here’s why.

Last Minute Solo and Ensemble Tips

I get it. Performing as a soloist might not be the most comfortable experience for you now, but with more practice and the right mindset, soloing can become one of your favorite ways to play. Here are seven tips on how to set yourself up for success at solo and ensemble.

Artist Spotlight: Christian Lindberg

Born February 15, 1958, Christian Lindberg is the most prolific trombone soloist in modern history. For over 40 years, he has been a full-time soloist, and he has premiered works by Arvo Part, Luciano Berio, and Michael Nyman among others. Having recorded over 60 solo albums as a trombonist, Lindberg has also recorded dozens of albums as a conductor. His signature model Conn 88HCL trombone is available through Paige’s Music.

To learn more about Christian Lindberg and his music please visit https://www.allmusic.com/artist/christian-lindberg-mn0001649636/biography

Lindsberg’s Youtube Channel
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNqsDg0CDcW0_reUddAWj0Q

 

Christian Lindberg 2019 Full Tokyo Recital

JJ Johnson – Artist Spotlight

JJ Johnson is regarded by many as the most important and influential trombonist of all time. His sound, phrasing, and harmonic language have sculpted the sound of the modern jazz trombone. The clarity and elegance of Johnson’s playing remain the benchmark. His international career was solidified his status as a consummate musician known for being an all-time great writer and player. Johnson was born and raised in Indianapolis, IN, and he attended Crispus Attucks High School.

Here is an excellent, concise biography by Scott Yanow at All Music.

Mute Madness!

Happy Thursday, everyone. Today’s topic is one of my favorite to talk about: Mutes. As stated by Philip Smith, former principal trumpet of the New York Philharmonic 1978-2014, “A trumpet player can never have enough mutes of varying types, shapes, sizes, and materials”. With that being said, as trumpet players (and other brass players who may be reading) we are often asked to use a device called a mute while playing certain music. This does not always mean making our sound softer per se, but changing our timbre. Today we’ll talk about the most common mute we are asked to use: the straight mute.

Interested in Studying Music? A Guide To Finding Your Path

Ball State University Jazz Combo

You’ve made the choice: you love music and want to pursue a career in the music industry! Great! So now what? At this point you need to determine which University, music program, and major are right for you. There are more music degrees than just performance or music education. Other music degrees include: Music production or recording technology, music therapy, music business, arts administration, music history, and music theory/composition. Some universities collaborate with local businesses to help offer a degree in popular music theory, analysis and composition. When researching your potential future, you have several resources at your disposal to find out information and some of the work can even be done at home with your parent/guardian.