Tips Posts

Tips For Attending ISSMA State Solo & Ensemble

 

ISSMA State Solo and Ensemble is this weekend at North Central High School in Indianapolis. Here are some tips to prepare for everything you need to consider beyond your music performance!

1. Be There Early

I am quite sure your director and private instructor has told you to be early for rehearsals, concerts, and etc. You definitely want to be early when it comes to Solo and Ensemble. You never know what could happen—the weather might be terrible and it may take twice as long as you planned, the performance order may change, a performance room might change, you might have issues with your instrument…anything can and probably will happen! Being early doesn’t fix these problems, but if definitely gives you the chance to get in the right headspace and deal with any problems effectively.

Basic Tips On Caring For Your Flute

Last summer we updated the care videos for several of the beginning instruments available on our Debut Rental Program. The original videos were done just before HD became popular, so it was time for a redo. Below is the general care and maintenance video for flute, with instruction given by Erin Nichols of the Indy Flute Shop. Indy Flute Shop is a flute-specialty store owned by Paige’s Music. If you’d like to see the rest of the flute videos, you can view them on our Flute Care & Maintenance page.

Don’t Let Your Instrument Be Cold

snow-tubasImage credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/kenpete/5522933139

Over the past few weeks central Indiana has experienced dramatic changes in temperatures—in a span of 4 days there was a temperature swing of 75 degrees! These dramatic fluctuations in temperature can wreak havoc on instruments. Cold weather in particular will cause serious issues with your instrument if you are not taking proper care of it.

Basic Tuning Tips For Woodwinds

We’d like to talk about the basics of tuning your woodwind instrument. While this may seem oversimplified there are some important details about the different families and the instruments within that are important to know.

All brass and woodwind instruments are designed around the A440/A442 pitch and can be adjusted higher (sharper) or lower (flatter) to a certain extent. Adjusting too far either way will affect the scale of the instrument and can actually cause playing problems.

On this blog we will start with the woodwinds.

The Importance Of Breathing Well

The most important factor in brass and woodwind performance is breathing. If you aren’t breathing well, it is very difficult to achieve a great sound on a wind instrument. The best instruments in the world won’t sound great unless you are breathing well!

Here is a short exercise that will enhance your awareness of your breathing:

Contest Season Is Coming Soon – Is Your Instrument Ready?

 

It’s not too late, but time is running out. Contest Season is almost here!

January through April is a really busy time of year for school music students. Many of the annual contests and festivals happen during this time of the year. These include:

  • Solo & Ensemble Contest
  • Jazz Band Festival
  • Junior/Middle School Organizational Festivals
  • High School Organizational Festivals

Your performance level and the success of your organization depend on a properly playing instrument. If your instrument has not been looked over by a technician in the last 6 months you may be overdue.

Send your instrument in for proper maintenance to help avoid small problems from turning into something larger at an inappropriate time. It could help you get to the next level during the upcoming contest season.

If you’d like to send your instrument in for us to check, we have a step-by-step guide on how to do that right here.

As always, please give us a call if you have any questions.

1-800-382-1099

Musical Instruments and Super Glue Don’t Mix

no-glue

 

We posted this a few years ago, but this has come up again a few times here recently.  So, we thought we’d pass this information along again!

CA glue is an ingenious product for certain applications. It is commonly called Super Glue or Krazy Glue, among other labels.   For orchestral or any musical instrument, it is dangerous and strictly taboo. A recent violin repair came in with bridge problems. The bridge was “loose” and had been superglued to the top. The result was a poor bond that failed and left a hard mess on the bridge and the violin finish. The bridge had to be replaced. Before this could be done, the CA glue on the finish needed to be removed. This is a tediously complicated and expensive task that is nearly impossible to accomplish without damage to the finish.

The bridge is meant to be held in place with string pressure and must not be glued to the top. CA glue, used anywhere on instruments will cause damage that is nearly always permanent, and is unnecessary. Please never, ever use CA glue on your instrument.

We also have band instruments come in quite often that have been super glued back together. Never a good idea! Super glue will never hold a post on or fix a tuning slide that has come apart. They must be soldered back together. Super glue is dangerous to remove and will also damage the finish on the instrument. Again, please never, ever use super glue on your instrument.

The technicians at Paige’s Music are here to help you solve playing condition problems professionally, enhancing the sound of your instrument and playing. Bring it to us. We are happy to help!

Should My Bridge Be Bent Like This?

cello-bad

Your bridge is an important component on your stringed instrument.  It is critically important to the sound, and playability.  It is a beautiful thing when it is right and an obstacle when it is not.  A warped bridge is not correct.  Even a slight warp will cause intonation problems.  The front of the bridge gives the impression of a lean toward the tailpiece.  It is shaped this way to give it the correct thickness, weight and to add to the beauty of the instrument. The back of the bridge should be perpendicular to the top of the instrument.