Lauren Newell – Student Spotlight

During the summer of 2018 we visited the Symphonic Youth Orchestra to interview some of their students. We were curious to find out how music has influenced them throughout their school careers, as well as how it has prepared them for the future. Next up is Lauren Newell from Lawrence North High School. Please take a few minutes to get to know her and all that she’s learned from being in orchestra.

A big thank you to Shawn Goodman and the rest of the staff at the Symphonic Youth Orchestra. To learn more about the SYO please visit their website at https://www.syogi.org.

The Strength of Every Democracy Is Measured By Arts Commitment

“The rapidly evolving global economy demands a dynamic and creative workforce. The arts and its related businesses are responsible for billions of dollars in cultural exports for this country. It is imperative that we continue to support the arts and arts education both on the national and local levels. The strength of every democracy is measured by its commitment to the arts.”

~ Charles Segars, CEO of Ovation

Britton Watson – Staff Spotlight

Our staff spotlight for October is on Britton Watson. Britton works with our Retail Sales team and has been with us for about 2 and a half years. Please watch his interview below to learn more about him and all that he does for our Retail team!

Music Helps Students Focus More Clearly On Tasks

“Students of all ages – that includes adults – generally find that music helps them focus more clearly on the task at hand and puts them in a better mood for learning.”

~ Chris Brewer, founder of LifeSounds Educational Services, quoted in “Boost Memory and Learning with Music,” pbs.org, Cheri Lucas.

Students Who Play An Instrument Have Large Growth Of Neural Activity

Research indicates the brain of a musician, even a young one, works differently than that of a nonmusician. “There’s some good neuroscience research that children involved in music have larger growth of neural activity than people not in music training. When you’re a musician and you’re playing an instrument, you have to be using more of your brain.”

~ Dr. Eric Rasmussen, chair of the Early Childhood Music Department at the Peabody Preparatory of The John Hopkins University, quoted in “The Benefits of Music Education,” pbs.org, Laura Lewis Brown.

Should My Bridge Be Bent Like This?

cello-bad

Your bridge is an important component on your stringed instrument.  It is critically important to the sound, and playability.  It is a beautiful thing when it is right and an obstacle when it is not.  A warped bridge is not correct.  Even a slight warp will cause intonation problems.  The front of the bridge gives the impression of a lean toward the tailpiece.  It is shaped this way to give it the correct thickness, weight and to add to the beauty of the instrument. The back of the bridge should be perpendicular to the top of the instrument.

Music Instruction Prepares Students for Multiple Disciplines

The cognitive structures developed through music instruction “exposed and illuminated more general organizing structures relevant for multiple disciplines.”

~ Portowitz,P., Lichtenstein, O., Egorova, L., & Brand, E. (2009). Underlying mechanisms linking music education and cognitive modifiability. Research Studies in Music Education, 31, 107–29

Elijah Gardner – Student Spotlight

During the summer of 2018 we visited the Symphonic Youth Orchestra to interview some of their students. We were curious to find out how music has influenced them throughout their school careers, as well as how it has prepared them for the future. Here’s our conversation with Elijah Gardner from Perry Meridian High School. Please take a few minutes to get to know him and what he plans to study in college!

A big thank you to Shawn Goodman and the rest of the staff at the Symphonic Youth Orchestra. To learn more about the SYO please visit their website at https://www.syogi.org.