Tips Posts

How To Keep Your Trumpet Clean

To further clean your instrument remove all valves, slides and caps from the trumpet. You may submerge the trumpet in warm water (should be noticeably warm but not scalding hot) with mild dish soap such as dawn. Let the instrument sit for five minutes and then use your valve casing brush and snake brush to remove excess dirt and debris from the trumpet. Absolutely DO NOT force the brushes into smaller spaces such as the valve ports or the ends of smaller tuning slides. The crook ends of the 1st and third valve tuning slides can be cleaned by running water through them.

Once all easily accessible areas of the trumpet have been scrubbed thoroughly rinse the trumpet in warm clean water and let air dry. Once the trumpet is dry you may then apply your necessary lubricants to moving parts and reassemble. Stay safe!

Trombone Etiquette For A Healthy Musicician

Let’s face it. Germs are a hot button issue right now. We should all take proper precautions every day, but there are many things that trombonists let slide (pun absolutely intended. I’m not proud). Here are some very common and very avoidable issues that many brass players make. 

Tips On How To Assemble Your Flute

We occasionally get instruments in for repair with common problems that are due to improper assembly or disassembly. In the video above one of our woodwind technicians, Steve “Sarge” Grimes, shares some flute assembly tips on how taking a flute apart improperly can damage the tenon joint over time. You can also find an instructional video on our blog covering some basic tips on caring for your flute.

The Case Against Beginner Buzzing

To start with, this is not an anti-buzzing campaign. Over my years of working with students whether it be privately, in group settings, or even observing other teachers working with them I have come to a conclusion: I think having your beginning trumpet players mouthpiece buzz is harmful to their development. Here’s why.

Which Valve Oil Is Right For Me?

Choosing the right valve oil at Paige's Music

At Paige’s Music, we are frequently asked “what valve oil do you recommend”? This answer can vary depending on the type and age of instrument as well as specific player preferences. Here is a short overview of our most popular options.

A Music Performance Lifestyle is an Athletic Lifestyle

If I had a dollar for every time someone has said “marching band is a sport!” I could by the entire S&P 500. It is a truly silly argument. It’s like saying a tomato is a fruit and not a vegetable—it may be technically correct but it doesn’t have any real-world implications. You can put tomatoes in a salad or in a salsa—one of which is mostly composed of vegetables, and one that is mostly composed of fruits. See—it’s just a point of view for the sake of having a point of view. This is not an editorial on such matters—it IS an editorial on approaching music performance like an athlete instead of purely as artistic expression.

Artist Spotlight: Christian Lindberg

Born February 15, 1958, Christian Lindberg is the most prolific trombone soloist in modern history. For over 40 years, he has been a full-time soloist, and he has premiered works by Arvo Part, Luciano Berio, and Michael Nyman among others. Having recorded over 60 solo albums as a trombonist, Lindberg has also recorded dozens of albums as a conductor. His signature model Conn 88HCL trombone is available through Paige’s Music.

To learn more about Christian Lindberg and his music please visit https://www.allmusic.com/artist/christian-lindberg-mn0001649636/biography

Lindsberg’s Youtube Channel
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNqsDg0CDcW0_reUddAWj0Q

 

Christian Lindberg 2019 Full Tokyo Recital

Deciphering your ISSMA Sheets and Other Feedback

These past couple weekends have been going full tilt with ISSMA Solo & Ensemble events. You’ve all worked hard on your solos. The ensembles large, small, and mixed have all been rehearsed. During this long period of preparation from November until now, you have probably heard many thoughts about your solo from your band/orchestra/choir director, friends, or private teachers. How do we take the things they have said and apply it? Is there really anyone out there that can read judge’s handwriting on those ISSMA sheets? What if your judge accidentally compliments your Baroque style when you are CLEARLY playing a classical era piece? There are ways to take all the comments you receive and organize them into your plan of attack when going to state.