January 2016 Posts

Basic Tuning Tips – Brass

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All brass instruments come with slides that move. The largest one is the “main tuning slide”. The others are used to tune individual notes. Some may need to be pulled out to make the instrument flatter, others are pushed in to make the instrument sharper. In the case of trombones, not only is there a “main tuning slide” but each note can be tuned by using the hand slide.

To start with, brass instruments are designed to play sharp. This can be corrected by moving the “main tuning slide” out about ¾ of an inch. When you play using a tuner you should see the instrument playing in tune with the “main tuning slide” pulled out about that far. This isn’t a rule, but a suggestion. You may find that your instrument plays in tune somewhere near to this measurement depending on the player, the brand of instrument and the condition of the instrument.trumpet-ringtrumpet-hook
Some instruments can be adjusted while playing. Trumpets, trombones and horns are found in this category. With the help of rings, hooks, saddles and well-lubricated slides notes can be adjusted while playing.

 

This brings me to the most important part of tuning. None of this matters if you don’t listen. Your ears are the most important “tuner” available. Listen with your ears and try to play in tune with those around you. Adjust your tuning slides and listen while you play. Watch your tuner and listen to your sound. Make an effort to play in tune. Just because the electronic tuner says that one note is in tune, doesn’t mean that all the notes you play are in tune. Listen and adjust.

Other things that can impact playing in tune are the condition of the mouthpiece and instrument. Are they clean and in good condition? Are their large dents in the mouthpiece, lead pipe and bell? Do the valves work easily? Are the bumpers in the pistons the correct size? Do the water keys leak?

This is only the beginning. As you progress in your musical career you’ll discover more ways to play in tune. It all starts with your ears, and an instrument in good shape. Practice playing in tune and listen, listen, listen.

Music Expresses That Which Cannot Be Put Into Words

“Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent.”
~ Victor Hugo

Older Adults Without Musical Experience Showed Improved Memory With Piano Lessons

Adults age 60 to 85 without previous musical experience exhibited improved processing speed and memory after just three months of weekly 30-minute piano lessons and three hours a week of practice, whereas the control group showed no changes in these abilities.
~ Nina Kraus, Samira Anderson, “Music Training: An Antidote for Aging?” Hearing Journal, Vol. 66, No. 3, March 2013.

The Who, What, Where, When and Why of Private Lessons

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You have probably at some point heard your student’s teacher, a Paige’s Music sales rep, or even your student mention taking private lessons. There are many factors to consider when deciding upon private lessons and a private lessons teacher. The goal of this article is to help you make an educated decision when it comes to private lessons.

First, you might be wondering, who are private lessons instructors? Private lessons teachers are typically professionally trained musicians who are proficient at one or more instruments. Anyone who is skillful, has a good knowledge of music theory as well as basic teaching methods can become a private instructor. These individuals often teach students ranging from beginner to advanced skill levels.

Next, what do private instructors do? As you can almost certainly assume private instructors provide a one-on-one teaching environment for a student. More specifically, they can focus on playing technique, tonal quality, precise excerpts or music the student might be playing in class or even individual solo pieces for contest. They are able to provide direct and immediate feedback to the student helping them implement the best overall performance standards.

There are a few places where you can inquire about finding a private instructor for your student. Our first recommendation is always to speak to the student’s band or orchestra teacher at school. They may have a preferred list of private instructors they have worked with in the past and would be comfortable referring you. Another place to search is the Paige’s Music website. We do provide a list of private instructors categorized by instrument for your convenience. Private lessons can take place at the student’s school, your home or the private instructor’s home.

Another common question we get asked at Paige’s is when should parents start their students in private lessons? While we would all like to respond with a resounding “NOW”, the answer might not be so simple. It really depends on the student and their needs. For example, if your student is struggling with their new instrument, it might benefit them to get some one-on-one instruction from someone more adept on their instrument. Additionally, many students consider private lessons further into their playing careers as a way of focusing on more specific techniques that sometimes are not covered in general band or orchestra class. Private lessons are often essential for students wanting to participate in solo and ensemble competitions or auditions for outside groups or college. Again, the student’s band or orchestra teacher is your best resource for determining if private lessons would benefit your student.

Finally, why private lessons? The answer is simple, to help your student get better. As discussed before, private lessons provide a professional environment for your student to get focused help with all aspects of playing their band or orchestra instrument. Whether your student is just starting out or is searching for more advanced instruction, there is always something to learn through individual, private lessons.

Schools With Music Programs Have Higher Graduation and Attendance Rates

Schools with music programs have an estimated 90.2% graduation rate and 93.9% attendance rate compared to schools without music education, which average 72.9% graduation and 84.9% attendance.
~ The National Association for Music Education. “Music Makes the Grade.” The National Association for Music Education. Accessed February 24, 2015.